What companies was Standard Oil broken into?

In 1911, following the Supreme Court ruling, Standard Oil was broken into seven successor companies; Standard Oil of New Jersey, Standard Oil of New York, Standard Oil of California, Standard Oil of Indiana, Standard Oil of Kentucky, The Standard Oil Company (Ohio), and The Ohio Oil Company.

What companies was Standard Oil broken up into?

Standard Oil

Type Cleveland, Ohio Corporation (1870) Business trust (1882–1892) New Jersey Holding Company (1899–1911)
Defunct After its dissolution in 1911, the original Standard Oil Co. split into Sohio (now part of BP); ESSO (now Exxon); and SOcal (now Chevron)
Successor 34 successor entities

How much is Standard Oil worth today?

If Standard Oil existed today in its single trust format, it would have been worth over $1 trillion making it the richest company in the world alongside Apple. And, John D. Rockefeller, if he were around today, would have had a net worth of around $400 billion, making him the richest man in the world.

What companies do the Rockefellers own?

In 1911, following the Supreme Court ruling, Standard Oil was broken into seven successor companies; Standard Oil of New Jersey, Standard Oil of New York, Standard Oil of California, Standard Oil of Indiana, Standard Oil of Kentucky, The Standard Oil Company (Ohio), and The Ohio Oil Company.

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How much of Exxon do the Rockefellers own?

Fossil-fuel investments represent about 6% of the Rockefeller Family Fund’s $130 million in holdings, Lee Wasserman, director of the foundation, said in a telephone interview on Wednesday.

Why did John Rockefeller start Standard Oil?

In 1870, he established Standard Oil, which by the early 1880s controlled some 90 percent of U.S. refineries and pipelines. Critics accused Rockefeller of engaging in unethical practices, such as predatory pricing and colluding with railroads to eliminate his competitors in order to gain a monopoly in the industry.

What was wrong with the Standard Oil Company?

One result largely attributable to Tarbell’s work was a Supreme Court decision in 1911 that found Standard Oil in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. The Court found that Standard was an illegal monopoly and ordered it broken into 34 separate companies. Bloodied, Rockefeller and Standard were hardly defeated.

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